Wow, great news for gamers like me, and possibly you. The World Health Organization (WHO), who has shared concern in the past over the potential pitfalls of spending too much time playing video games, have given them their thumbs up. At least during the COVID-19 quarantine.

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This comes as a surprise for so many who've become accustomed to having one of their favorite pastimes chided by health experts who feel that spending too much time playing video games can lead to addiction and subsequent health challenges.

In fact, Globalnews.ca reports "The WHO — the United Nations’ public health organization — has put its support behind a gaming industry initiative called #PlayApartTogether, aimed at keeping people socially active while remaining isolated."

Ah, this may explain the turnaround. There's legitimate concern that people who are doing their best to stay home may become too socially isolated. This, and loneliness generally, have become a concern long before the Coronavirus pandemic became our new reality. Now more than ever, finding ways to stay connected with people has become a priority.

On top of that, and as many gamers might agree, playing video games doesn't always equate to mindlessly vegging out while overdosing on pizza. Sure, it CAN go that way. But for many, depending on the video games and mindset while playing, gaming can be a thought-provoking and engaging way to spend time.

I've received some criticism over the years for enjoying stints of game time from the same people who will literally spend hours binge-watching [insert show here] and feel there's nothing wrong with that.

How's that different from playing a video game? Well, I would argue, that playing a game at least requires some interactive response from "player one."

That's not to say I believe any activity in which you spend hours immobile is an ideal way to spend all of your free time. Like with everything else, there needs to be balance. You still need exercise, sunshine, healthy meals, and time interacting with people "in real life."

Read more here and share your feedback in the comments below.